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It’s hard to believe DBlog Week is almost over!  But here goes!

Today’s topic is what does life with diabetes look like.  My take, being an athletic themed diabetes blog, is to show what I did on this absolutely beautiful Newfoundland summer’s day!

I knew the weather would be great, but we got to bed late, so I had hoped to sleep until 6.  Well, the morning actually started with a 4:45 wake up call from Winston, the foster.  I got up, fed the three fur kids, then fed myself my usual pre-ride meal (oatmeal, yogurt, cappuccino).  Then I took the creatures out to pee and realized it was going to actually be a warm day.  This was a shocker since we had snow this week!  Anywho, I got my summer kit on, and got my ride goodies ready.  My plan was 3 two-bite pies (sourdough quick “crust”, blueberries with a strawberry preserve, creme cheese, and a bit of brown sugar – ~110 cal each, 21 g carb) and a bottle of skratch labs.  The plan was a 40ish mile bike ride with lots of hills, so I wanted to make sure I had enough glycogen for the climbs at hand.  Just in case I took 10 sugar pills and a sugar gel – they were not needed.  For once I took my blood meter because I figured the Dexcom wouldn’t mess up on me that way. 🙂

And of course, my pump in my trusty jersey pocket.

Diabetic riding kit

Diabetic riding kit

One of the many reasons I use 43" tubing!

One of the many reasons I use 43″ tubing!

My plan was to warm up the legs with 4 miles of easy, fast cycling, then hit some hill climbs (Cat 3 and Cat 4) on my way out to Cape Spear, the most eastern point in North America.  It’s a great and challenging ride.  The climbs are leg burners and the descents are epic.  Here’s a link to the route.  Anyways, it was an amazing ride as planned – definitely not as fast as Texas flats, but a hell of a lot more fun.  On the ride out to Cape Spear I spotted an iceberg in a little village called Blackhead, so I marked that for the return trip.  I did NOT want to loose momentum before the climb out of Blackhead.  After the final climb I descended into Cape Spear and fully spun out my gearing (50×12) and hit 73 km/h.  It was riveting!  You could hear me yelling this is *$)(% awesome the whole way in. 🙂  Anyways, a nice person out sightseeing at 6:30 AM snapped a photo of me, and I snapped a photo for the readers of the most eastern point in North America.

The Wilier with the furthest east point in the background

The Wilier with the furthest east point in the background

Sunrise at Cape Spear

Sunrise at Cape Spear

Me at Cape Spear

Me at Cape Spear

And of course, the diabetic portion of this post.  I took this chance to check in, about 1/4 way into my planned ride.  Blood glucose levels were perfect!  5 mmol/l, flat trend since breakfast onward.  Since it was about 40-50 minutes in, I popped a two bite pie, had a sip of skratch.  I tried to snag a photo of this, but alas, the sun glared out the Dexcom.

Diabetes and riding can be a tasty endeavour.

Diabetes and riding can be a tasty endeavour.

Next, I climbed back out of Cape Spear and descended into Blackhead.  I tapped on the brakes a bit on that descent.  It was super windy and the road quality was a bit sketchy.  I didn’t need road rash at 70 clicks an hour.  Here’s what greeted me and Wilier there:

Iceberg at Blackhead!

Iceberg at Blackhead!

I texted Meg to let her know how things were going, and then climbed out of Blackhead.  I turned towards Petty Harbour/Maddox Cove and met up with a runner jogging up one of the hills.  Great training.  I had a wonderful ride through Petty Harbour through to the Goulds.  That’s when I decided the day was just too beautiful and decided to ride out to Bay Bulls and back (~20 mile addition) – I also ate my second pie here.  It was great – I felt slow, but that was the wind in my face.  On the return (which I ate my third pie at) I was benefitting from that wind!  A majority of the end of the ride was spent at ~35 km/h, so I can’t complain! 🙂  I didn’t stop to snag any more photos because I was having too much fun.  I got back to the house just in time to head to the market in town.  All told, I got in 82.5 km (51 miles).  I contemplated going for a full metric (100k), but I didn’t want to be too selfish.

So how did my blood sugar do?  I could not have asked for a better blood sugar day!  My alarm levels are 70-140 mg/dL – yes, I know, I’m Canadian.  I got the Dexcom in the USA, and haven’t paid to switch to a mmol/L unit yet.  For the metric readers, that is 3.9-7.8.  Anyways, by monitoring my CGMS, my HR and planning my nutrition I was able to get in this amazing ride and not once did diabetes get in the way.  This is what the point of this blog is – yes, it’s a lot of work.  But when you get it figured out, you can really knock it out of the park!  This is what a day in the life of an active diabetic can look like.  It’s not every day, some just don’t work, but I promise you, we can do this – we can manage this disease so it doesn’t get in the way, and we can have a hell of a good time in the process.

Now back to this beautiful day!

Perfection!

Perfection!

So, total stats:

Calories Burned: 1843 cal (per Garmin, Strava too optimistic)

Calories Consumed on Ride: 446 calories (not counting breakfast)

Carbohydrates Consumed on Ride: 89g total, 3g fibre, 86 g net carb

Insulin Bolused: None; I had a temp bolus running from breakfast that covered these carbs and made sure it went to the muscles

Enjoyment: Immeasurable

 

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